Iconic Objects

Bumblebee

Bumblebee isn’t a very imposing name. But at 17 feet tall and weighing one ton, Bumblebee the Transformer is quite an imposing figure. Built as a prop for the 2007 movie Transformers , the Bumblebee that now greets visitors in...

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The Carousel

Originally installed in an amusement park known as White City, on the eastern bank of the White River in Broad Ripple Village, in 1917, the Carousel was a favorite of families for decades.

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Edward Black Drum

In 1861 Edward Black was 8 years old. Though he was too young to fight for the Union Army—combat soldiers were supposed to be at least 18, though many 15-, 16- and 17-year-olds managed to lie their...

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Lilly Playhouse

Evelyn (Evie) Lilly was the daughter of Eli Lilly and his first wife Evelyn Fortune Lilly. Born in 1918, Evie was an only child and was doted on by her parents, both before and after their divorce in 1926

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Log Cabin

In the early 1800s, log cabins were numerous in the heavily wooded landscape of Indianapolis and central Indiana, though by the 1960s most had vanished. But not the 130-year-old cabin owned by museum trustee Reily Adams...

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Mastodon

Shaggy-haired ancestors of today’s elephants, mastodons once roamed North America including what is now Indiana. One of those prehistoric creatures came out of hiding in 1976 when a Hancock County farmer discovered some large rib bones and teeth while excavating...

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The Mummy Wenuhotep

“As far as children are concerned, a museum is not a museum without a mummy,” director Grace Golden once remarked in a letter. Golden finally was able to fill that hole in the museum’s collection...

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Polar Bear

To some people, a polar bear is a majestic animal. To others it’s a scary beast. But no matter what your perception, it’s undeniable that as global warming continues to shrink the polar icecap and warm the Arctic Sea polar...

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The Reuben Wells

Picture this: a hill so steep that most 19th-century locomotives couldn’t safely convey freight or passenger cars up or down it. That was the challenge facing railroads and engineers hoping to service Madison, Indiana, which was situated in a valley bordering the Ohio River.

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Norman Rockwell's Scout Memories

Norman Rockwell (1894–1977) was one of America’s best-known 20 th -century artists, creator of hundreds of cover illustrations for magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post and Boy’s Life . The Boy Scouts of America published the latter magazine; Rockwell...

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Toy Trains

Noble Biddinger was an investment banker by profession, but a toy train enthusiast by passion. In fact his north side Indianapolis home was as much a depot as a family residence, housing close to 2,000 toy locomotives, freight and passenger cars, and accessories.

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Water Clock

On any given day, as 1 p.m. approaches, crowds gather in the Sunburst Atrium at The Children’s Museum. They watch in anticipation as blue liquid fills the final glass globe marking the hours on a 30-foot-tall water clock. When all...

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